7 Ways to Attract First Chair Leaders to a Second Chair Position

Handshake - extraversio

I was asked a great question recently while visiting with a group of leadership students from a nearby Christian college.

How do you attract (and keep) “first chair” type leaders into a “second chair” position?

These young leaders are ambitious. They are ready to make their mark on society. Most are studying for ministerial positions within the church. I always advise young leaders, if they can, to sit under a seasoned leader for a while, learning all they can, before they venture out on their own. I had just offered this advice which prompted the question.

I realize that’s not always the advice a young, ready-to-go leader type wants to hear — and I get that, since I was one of those younger leaders. And, we learn mostly by failure, so there is something to be said for jumping out on your own, getting both feet wet (to use another cliche metaphor), and starting something new.

Many of these young leaders will be church planters, and we need them to be. We need more church planters. Still, if I was advising one of my own children, I’d give the same advice. If possible, sit under a seasoned leader first.

This group had been studying the concept of first chair and second chair leadership, so that prompted a good, obvious question.

(For some help with definition, if needed, the first chair leader usually has a title such as C.E.O., President, Senior Pastor. Second chair leaders have a title such as C.O.O., Vice President, Associate Pastor.)

How do you attract (and keep) “first chair” type leaders into a “second chair” position?

They followed that question with another equally good question.

They asked if I felt I could ever again be a second chair leader. At this point, they knew my history. I’ve been a first chair leader for well over 20 years.

My answer to the second question first.

Yes. I could be a second chair leader.

My answer to the second question. With the number 7 — of course.

Here are 7 ways to attract (and keep) first chair leaders in a second chair position:

Remove the lids – The real reason most people resist the second chair is they don’t want to be limited in how much they can achieve. The best first chair leaders are willing to get out of the way and let people around them lead — even if the second chair person’s success gains more notoriety than the first chair.

Empower individual dreams – If a second chair person feels the freedom to dream big dreams — even individual dreams — they’ll be fueled to continue in the role. They may have to be empowered to work on dreams that are even outside the vision of their current organization. Of course, they still need to meet all the requirements of a good second chair leader, so there should be loyalty to the place where they are currently serving in the second chair.

Let the leader build a team – Second chair leaders, who are qualified to be first chair leaders, need to have the freedom to build their own teams. They should be able to recruit and lead their own people. (Again, I can offer this qualifier in every point, but this is with the understanding that there is an overall vision that must be maintained, and ultimately that vision holder is the first chair leader.)

Invite their input into larger decisions – This is huge. Second chair leaders who could be first chair leaders want to play a part in the overall strategy and implementation of the organization. They have ideas. They have energy to invest in them. They want to make a difference. If you want to keep them you have to give them a seat at the lead table.

Give them a voice – This goes with the last one, but not only should they have a seat at the table, but their input should matter. Their opinion must make a difference in the overall direction of the organization. The weight of their suggestions must be valuable in making final decisions. Hyper controlling leaders will have a very hard time with this one, but it’s critical to retaining the best “first chair minded” — second chair leaders.

Don’t Micromanage – This one probably goes without saying. The best first chair leaders don’t micromanage anyone, but this is especially true if you want to attract the first chair leader types into the second chair. You certainly can and should have broad goals and objectives for them to achieve, and, again, they should be working for the same overall vision of the entire organization, but then, if you want to keep them, get out of their way and let them do their work.

Extend recognition – Don’t hog the glory. (Of course, the only real glory goes to God, but don’t be afraid to celebrate their success.)

Let me be clear, as I tried to be with the leadership students, there are exceptional second chair leaders who never desire to be first chair leaders. They are awesome! I love having them on my team. In fact, I’ll be transparent enough to say that without some of them I am very ineffective as a first chair leader. You don’t want me in the first chair unless I have some good second chair people around me.

There are good first chair leaders serving in second chair positions. Keeping them is more difficult, because they are natural first chairs. There’s another blog post here on how I spot a first chair leader, but I have always had some on my team. They make me and the organization (or church) I lead even better.

Granted, some don’t even like this type discussion, especially in a ministerial context, because Jesus is in the first chair — ALWAYS — and, I totally agree with that — and to some, who don’t appreciate the concept, it my sound egotistical. I get that too. I’ve written about the church afraid of leadership previously. But, if you want to ignore the realities of organizational structures that exist in any place where two or more people are gathered, including the church, you can probably ignore this post.

If you want to attract and keep them — I hope this post helps.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Add video comment

Have you Subscribed via RSS yet? Don't miss a post!

21 thoughts on “7 Ways to Attract First Chair Leaders to a Second Chair Position

  1. I'm working on a post for next week on how to know you're a first chair leader — or ready to be. There isn't a time I don't think, but there is a certain maturity I would look for. I think we often know if we are ready, but sometimes need someone to affirm is in it. But, think of it like this. You're leader of your own home now. Chances are you don't have it all figured out yet either — some days you may even feel overwhelmed with the pressure, but you're far more prepared than when you were in high school or just graduated. Aren't you glad you waited? Hope you are well Dan. 

  2. I'm working on a post for next week on how to know you're a first chair leader — or ready to be. There isn't a time I don't think, but there is a certain maturity I would look for. I think we often know if we are ready, but sometimes need someone to affirm is in it. But, think of it like this. You're leader of your own home now. Chances are you don't have it all figured out yet either — some days you may even feel overwhelmed with the pressure, but you're far more prepared than when you were in high school or just graduated. Aren't you glad you waited? Hope you are well Dan. 

  3. I'm working on a post for next week on how to know you're a first chair leader — or ready to be. There isn't a time I don't think, but there is a certain maturity I would look for. I think we often know if we are ready, but sometimes need someone to affirm is in it. But, think of it like this. You're leader of your own home now. Chances are you don't have it all figured out yet either — some days you may even feel overwhelmed with the pressure, but you're far more prepared than when you were in high school or just graduated. Aren't you glad you waited? Hope you are well Dan. 

  4. I'm working on a post for next week on how to know you're a first chair leader — or ready to be. There isn't a time I don't think, but there is a certain maturity I would look for. I think we often know if we are ready, but sometimes need someone to affirm is in it. But, think of it like this. You're leader of your own home now. Chances are you don't have it all figured out yet either — some days you may even feel overwhelmed with the pressure, but you're far more prepared than when you were in high school or just graduated. Aren't you glad you waited? Hope you are well Dan. 

  5. I'm working on a post for next week on how to know you're a first chair leader — or ready to be. There isn't a time I don't think, but there is a certain maturity I would look for. I think we often know if we are ready, but sometimes need someone to affirm is in it. But, think of it like this. You're leader of your own home now. Chances are you don't have it all figured out yet either — some days you may even feel overwhelmed with the pressure, but you're far more prepared than when you were in high school or just graduated. Aren't you glad you waited? Hope you are well Dan. 

  6. I'm working on a post for next week on how to know you're a first chair leader — or ready to be. There isn't a time I don't think, but there is a certain maturity I would look for. I think we often know if we are ready, but sometimes need someone to affirm is in it. But, think of it like this. You're leader of your own home now. Chances are you don't have it all figured out yet either — some days you may even feel overwhelmed with the pressure, but you're far more prepared than when you were in high school or just graduated. Aren't you glad you waited? Hope you are well Dan. 

  7. Hey Ron, I loved this post. I had a couple of follow up questions. How long do you typically recommend a young first chair leader sit in the second chair? Obviously it depends on the individual and the leader, but in general there is always more to learn. What process would you go through to evaluate when the young leader seems ready to branch out? Thanks! Miss sitting in the chair under you!

  8. Over the last two years I've been blessed to have two high capacity leaders step up to lead each of my classes as the 2nd in command. Far more ministry has gotten done, and it's removed an enormous weight off my shoulders. Like you said, by giving them a voice, freedom and not micro-managing has empowered them to do great things.

  9. Ron this is a strong list. Just about every person on my team could be leading in a first chair elsewhere. The lessons here don't come easily for those of us in the first chair though. Thankfully second chair leaders, if they are strong leaders, recognize that, and help open up doors gracefully.