12 Random Tweetable Leadership Principles

Here are 12 random leadership axioms in less than 140 characters each.

Some have been previous tweets.

  • Some people will only support you after it’s proven to be a success. They are the same people who will say I told you so if it doesn’t work.
  • Sometimes the strongest thing to do is to turn the other cheek. Sometimes it’s to stand your ground.
  • The applause we solicit are seldom genuine.
  • The best opportunities seldom come wrapped neatly in a package with a bow on top. They usually come with work. Get your hands dirty work.
  • The best leaders are often the ones smart enough to get out of the way of smarter people.
  • Part of leadership is the willingness to make hard decisions no one else on the team wants to make,
  • Sometimes a leader’s worst day is the organization’s best day.
  • The leader has a responsibility to do the right thing for the organization, regardless of whether it brings instant popularity.
  • Don’t stop doing the right thing even when the wrong thing is receiving more celebration. That party won’t last.
  • Some of a leader’s best work is not what the leader does but what he or she inspires others to do.
  • Without the right systems in place, the best visions will eventually suffer. Systematize what you want and need repeated.
  • The resistance to change comes more out of desire for personal comfort.

Feel free to tweet a few.

Do you have any to add to the list? Which of these should I expand into a future blog post?

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

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10 thoughts on “12 Random Tweetable Leadership Principles

  1. Can't agree with the first one completely (Some people will only support you after it’s proven to be a success. They are the same people who will say I told you so if it doesn’t work.) I don't think there is a perfect correlation.

    I don't think I have been the first one but I have told people at first that I didn't think it would work but gave them kudos for showing me it did. I have also had sit downs with people after something crashed and burned to do a "I told you so" in the form of a post-mortem in an attempt to make it a learning experience. Only about half the time was it a beneficial exercise. Usually the person was in a lot of pain and defensive.