The Tension Between Being Accessible and Being Available

The larger the church gets the greater the tension I feel between being accessible and being available.

I want to always be accessible.

I can’t always be available.

To me, being accessible means you can easily find me online.
It means I answer emails promptly…
It means I return phone calls in a reasonable time…
It means I will help you get the help or answer you need…

However, there are too many demands on my time to always be available…

My time, like everyone’s time, is limited…
I must make the smartest use of it….
It means I may not be the best person to meet with you…
It means some days I can only spend time investing in the staff who work at Grace…
It means I need to reserve ample time for Bible study, prayer, and sermon preparation…
It means I may refer you to someone who is more available at the time…

Some weeks, just being honest, sadly, I end up saying “No” more than I get to say “Yes…

If time were limitless I’d rather always be available.

By the way, the Acts 6 model of doing church understood this tension…

Pastors, do you ever feel the tension between being accessible and being available?

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

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16 thoughts on “The Tension Between Being Accessible and Being Available

  1. Good thinking Ron!

    Google "Dunbar's number". It will change your life if you buy the concept. If you have 21% relatives as Dunbar calculates in your 150 then you are left with 120 slots for everyone else. If you assign 60 of those to friends, associates and neighbors you are left with 60 slots for church people. Manage them well and pick the reliable ones to pour your energy through.

  2. Ron! I think this in true in case of all kinds of leaders. A leader cannot keep on saying 'yes' for everything. He need to know where to draw the line. Pritoritizing is a important skill a leader must learn.

  3. This is a good topic for anyone who works from home. For example, in my case, a boarding kennel owner who lives on the premises. Folk expect us to be available at all times. We must at least have one day off per week. We must have time to read the Bible, go to church, and recharge.

  4. Ron, thanks for the clarification between being accessible and being available. As a busy pastor and leader I often struggle with this. I want to do it all and be available to all but many times when I try to do both I usually end of frustrated. I'm learning to say no to people. I had to say no to someone today and at first it bothered me but it was the best thing to do.
    Twitter: ericspeir

  5. Thats great if the Pastor is full time and has assoc. pastors to help. But, when the pastor has to work a full time job and pastor a church full time with no assoc. it gets tricky. I believe every pastor should serve one year as a by- vocational pastor with no assoc. to help out. That's when you really get to learn how to pastor. My husband has been pastoring at our growing church for over a year so I can make this comment openly and honestly. Good thing my husband is available and accessible to our church family.

    • Thank you Michelle for your comment. I appreciate you and your husband's ministry. I sense some "tension" even in your reply. I didn't say I was never available, just that I can't always be. Let me also say that I have served bi-vocationally, the first 3 years as a pastor, so I do understand the pressures of that role. I also, however, believe that the Acts 6 model works there. Your husband can't be everywhere. He may be more available to his church than I can be, but if he is everything to everyone, then eventually he will wear out and something will suffer. If nothing else, leaders in the church will not be developed, because your husband does it all. I don't think you're saying that and I realize (as I said I've done it) that your husband has huge demands on him, but I also believe you and he both must protect your personal time, his study time, and use your time as wisely as possible, allowing other leaders in the church to do some things. Again, Acts 6 speaks to this well. I'm assuming your church does have deacons, committees, elders, Sunday school teachers, or some other leaders who carry some of the load. I hope so for the future of the church.

      God bless.