Balancing the Big Deals Within an Organization

As a leader, I have to consistently remind myself that one person’s big deal may not be another person’s big deal…

Those in finance and administration naturally think their role is critical to the success of the organization, which may lead them to think that attention should be given to finances above everything else.

Those in small group ministry naturally think their role is critical to the success of the organization, which may lead them to think that attention should be given to small group ministry above everything else.

Those in worship planning naturally think their role is critical to the success of the organization, which may lead them to think that attention should be given to worship planning above everything else.

Those in children’s ministry naturally think their role is critical to the success of the organization, which may lead them to think that attention should be given to children’s ministry above everything else.

You get the point.  Of course, the ultimate “big deal” is the vision of your organization. As a church, we want to “lead people to become growing followers of Jesus Christ“. While everyone on our team agrees with that vision, they are also rightfully passionate about and actively involved in their specific role in accomplishing that overall vision. I wouldn’t want it any other way, but at times that focused passion for their role can cloud their ability to see the big picture.

From the overall leadership perspective, all areas have equal importance in accomplishing the organization’s objectives, therefore part of leader’s job is balancing all the big deals towards one combined big deal…the vision of the organization.  We can’t spend all our energy, time, and resources in one particular area, as important as that area is to the success of the organization. Resources will always be stretched to meet the needs of the entire organization.

Frankly, finding that balance has always been difficult for me, and at times in the life of the organization, one area does require greater attention than other areas.  The key for me is recognizing the individual contribution each area brings to that success, while always keeping the big picture in my mind of what we are trying to accomplish as an organization; not allowing any one area to dominate my heart and mind. I can never allow one area to cloud out my perspective of the other areas.

Leaders, do you share this dilemma?  How do you balance the big deals within your organization?

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4 thoughts on “Balancing the Big Deals Within an Organization

  1. I don't envy you guys at all! I have enough just to keep my students focused on the content I am teaching. I'm sure just trying to keep everything balanced sends you to your knees. And, that's a good thing! :-)

  2. Ron,

    Great post with a great question. Here's one of my balance challenges. Our Church meets in a Cinema Center so we have set up teams who prepare the facility for Sunday. Our Children's ministry (Imagination Station) meets in the hallway. Each team is fulfilling our mission of turning people toward grace. Each team has needs that include time constraints and volunteer recruitment.

    If we aren't careful the setup team begins to constrain the Children's ministry team. For example, the less equipment and supplies needed the easier the setup teams job becomes. So, setup teams advocate for simplicity. I don't blame them.

    Currently our approach is to give more weight to the Children's ministry team because it is engaged in first level ministry. That means we encourage the setup team to bite the bullet.

    It's a challenge that we address by focusing on mission and vision.

    Regards,

    Dan